A B O U T M E

Many ask about her name and it is not simply a stage name, her real name is Chelsea Blues…

Because my father is a Chelsea FC fan.

Born and raised between The Bahamas & The Turks & Caicos Islands; ​I began writing poetry and making up lyrics at 8 years old and began wanting to do music more (i.e. Youtube vids) at about 16 then forgot about music as a dream until about three years later when I eventually moved to London, UK (aspiring to be an actress) and met other musicians that relit the fire for music. Ever since then I have been working on my music dreams and goals between London and The Bahamas.

When I write or freestyle songs – I tend to focus on if my writing coincides with my musical ethos.

Chelsea bases herself on legends such as Ella Fitzgerald and Bobby McFerrin in terms of freestyle and scats, and LauyrnHillErykah Badu and Amy Winehouse for lyricism and vocal texture. In terms of inspiration, however, the Caribbean girl focuses on her musical ethos. I dive into my spiritual influences; books I’ve read (i.e The Alchemist – Paulo Cohelo; The Secret; The Celestine Prophecy), colours and what they mean (i.e: chakras), numerology, theories I know.”

 

I dive into my spiritual influences; books I’ve read (i.e. The Alchemist – Paulo Cohelo; The Secret; The Celestine Prophecy), colours and what they mean (i.e.: chakras), numerology, theories I know.

Also, I look at my musical idols. What – to me – was the best way to say something or portray an idea and how can I improve for my sound. I look to persons like Bobby McFerrin, Ella Fitzgerald, Amy Winehouse, and Erykah Badu. How did they get the feel to match the words? How’d they make that string of sentences work and have double meaning — can I flip it also? How much breath should I give the beat? etc.

And also my cultural influences – how can I make something that can be understood regardless of cultural background? When do I want lines that are mainly significant to my people so they feel the love special for them – that doesn’t also exclude the wider audience I am trying to reach with my message…

After leaving uni I returned home for a year and a half and hit a depression as I couldn’t find a way to continue music. Eventually I was taken to the only open mic on island (Nassau) at the time. Changed my life. Eventually began running that open mic on a weekly basis, then was approached by a few friends who wanted to run a web TV series. IndieVybez ran for a year before I returned to London. Ended up working with the top reggae band on island singing BVs and opened for reggae legends Tarrus Riley & Beres Hammond.

I returned Jan 2016 to London and finally releasing my first project.

 

It’s so much fun! A traditional performance is fun also – but the adrenaline of not knowing what you’re going to perform is electrifying!

It’s a moment of absolute wholehearted living.

I mean forget the fact that if you mess up there’s no filter or re-do. Once you’re there you’re there! The crowd makes it though. When you tell them you’ve done a freestyle after you’ve sang – about 20% of people will believe you. When you tell them at the beginning – depending on how magical it is – 50% will believe you.

When you call out for 3-5 words to create a song on spot – ahh – NOW you have their full attention. When the whole place is now fully attentive to see how you find to string together the words “Bacon” “beach” “fire” and “concentration” – it really is both a little daunting and yet exhilarating. Only you know what may possibly come next but the more fun you have with it – everyone else does and it becomes a memorable and intimate moment that lasts between you and the crowd and their phone cameras! They then go online and talk about the “summer nights of fire and bacon, chilling on the beach, concentratinggg on not caring who sees!”

 

Chelsea was born in The Bahamas & The Turks & Caicos Islands, and began writing lyrics and poetry from the tender age of 8. She experimented with music as a teenager but went on to pursue other avenues. Chelsea eventually moved to London as an aspiring actress but rediscovered her love for music instead. “After leaving uni I returned home for a year and a half and hit a depression as I couldn’t find a way to continue music,” Chelsea explained. “Eventually, I was taken to the only open mic on the island (Nassau) at the time. It changed my life. After a while, I began running that open mic night on a weekly basis, then I was approached by a few friends who wanted to run a web TV series. IndieVybez ran for a year before I returned to London where I ended up working with the top reggae band on the island singing BVs and opened for reggae legends Tarrus Riley and Beres Hammond.” Incredible. Chelsea returned to London nearly three years ago and released her first project.

Chelsea isn’t all about the music, either. She releases poetry books! Three to be exact. I’ve been writing poetry since the age of eight. I’ve filled so many lined books (that should’ve been for homework) with poems – as many as I could fit onto a page,” Chelsea explained. She put together her first poetry book ‘2014 = 7’ in December 2013, sent it to her mom to proof-read and self-published it online in the following January. It began as a challenge to make my mark on the world before hitting 21, haha. I wrote 21 poems in two weeks. I chose to write about my life through a journey I was embarking on; the journey to self-love.” 

Chelsea had a rest from poetry for a year and made a comeback in 2015 with ‘In the Mind of a Psycho Goddess’. This release followed her decline into an alcoholic depression of which she climbed out thanks to her love for music and writing. “I wrote of moments I’d missed and fragments in time that seemed just a blur.  I also wrote of moments to be proud of and reaching out beyond what I perceived as my limitations in time.”

Then came her third and ‘favourite’ book ‘PO3TRY’ which is made up of three chapters and consists of “poems for healing, mixed diaries and random travel thoughts”.